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food

  • Meals on Wheels

    Food trucks are becoming increasingly popular in cities around the country due to their convenience and unique food options. There are even Gourmet Food Truck Festivals around the US, and guides to help gourmands and vacationers find them to explore the mobile munchies

    Food Truck Festival

    One food truck in Los Angeles, gave the food truck phenomena a new twist - We've talked about Food & Hunger in the past; well this food truck serves free burritos to homeless people in the community. According to the Huffington Post, he Share A Meal food truck is run by nonprofit Khalsa Peace Corps and they started the program in 2009 out of a desire to serve the community. Every Monday through Friday, the Share A Meal truck goes out to different areas in Los Angeles with volunteers making anywhere from 150 to 250 burritos per night!

  • Is That Safe to Eat?

    We've talked about Power Outages in the past ( What is the most common emergency? ) But have you considered how  Power outages can jeopardize the safety of the food stored in your home refrigerator or freezer. If you lose electricity, do you know how to determine if your food is safe to eat? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers tips to follow before and after a power outage to minimize loss of food and lower the risk of foodborne illness:

    • Gather an emergency food supply of shelf-stable food, boxed or canned milk, bottled water, and canned goods;
    • Have coolers and frozen gel packs on hand to keep refrigerated food cold if the power goes out longer than four hours;
    • Buy an appliance thermometer for the refrigerator and freezer and a food thermometer to help you know if the food has stayed at a safe temperature during an outage;
    • Throw out any perishable food items such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and leftovers that have been exposed to temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit for more than two hours;
    • Use a food thermometer to test the temperature of food – never taste it!  You can’t rely on appearance and odor to determine whether food is safe; and
    • Discard any items in the refrigerator that have come into contact with raw meat juices.

    Keep in mind that your refrigerator will keep food cold safely for about four hours if it is unopened. A full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed.

    food-safety-power-outageDid you know that a flood or fire can also impact the safety of food in your home? Be sure to check out the FAQs on the USDA website about keeping food safe after these emergencies.

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