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CDC

  • COVID-19 Read the Latest from Public Health Officials & Agencies

    COVID-19

    COVID-19 virus close-up -3D-.

    As a health and safety training organization, amid ongoing concerns of the COVID-19
    Our instructors,
    clients, employees, and their families are of our biggest concern.

    We are closely monitoring the situation and following guidance from public health officials and government
    agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

    If you would like additional information about COVID-19, we recommend you visit the CDC website at cdc.gov or
    your local health department website.


    For safety and to prevent spread of respiratory disease we are asking all our American CPR Training™
    Affiliate Instructors to follow precautionary practices and are recommending that our employees, clients and
    their staff do the same:

    • Wash hands often with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds – have fun timing it by humming or
      singing a refrain of "Stayin' Alive," by The Bee Gees (also a favorite song for performing CPR!)
    • Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth. (The average person touches their face 15-23 times per hour without
      even realizing it!)
    • Cover cough or sneeze using a bent elbow - not hand.
    • Use hand sanitizer gel if soap and water is unavailable.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • If you sneeze, cover your mouth with a tissue, throw it in the trash, and wash your hands.
    • Consider using a paper towel or tissue to open common area doors, wherever possible.
    • If you do not feel well please stay home.

    * An additional special recommendation for American CPR Training™ Instructors:

    Two COVID-19 in 3D on black background

    When training, it is still very important to include the 2 breaths when teaching regular C.A.R.E™ CPR, but during what has now been announced as a worldwide pandemic by WHO, we recommend you have the students “speak” the breath part during the hands-on training rather than actually breathing onto the manikin - even with the breathing barrier American CPR Training™ provides for every student in our student packs. Every course with American CPR™ also, of course, covers Compression Only CPR™ for students unwilling or unable to perform full CPR.

    Also - remember to regularly sterilize and wipe down your manikins and AED trainers with disinfecting wipes after every class.


    We all need to do our part in order to avoid spreading this disease, and to avoid fear and uncertainty by
    taking intelligent precautions. We trust that you are all taking good care of yourselves and those around
    you and in your community.

    As a public service organization we take our responsibility to remain open seriously.
    You can still reach us during normal business hours via phone or email.

    Our thoughts go out to anyone who has been directly impacted by this situation.

  • Healthy and Safe Swimming Importance Info

    The week before Memorial Day (May 20–26, 2019) is Healthy and Safe Swimming Week. The goal of this awareness week is to maximize the health benefits of swimming by minimizing the risk of illness and injury. Just 2.5 hours of physical activity every week, including water-based physical activity, can benefit everyone’s health. Each of us plays a role in preventing illnesses and injuries linked to the water we swim, play, relax in, and share. Swimming is a fun, healthy way to stay physically active and spend quality time with family and friends. Healthy and Safe Swimming Week highlights the roles that swimmers, parents of young swimmers, aquatics and beach staff, residential pool owners, and public health officials play in preventing disease outbreaks, drowning, and pool chemical injuries.

    Why Is Healthy and Safe Swimming Week Important?

    Injuries caused by mishandling pool chemicals:
    Pool chemicals are added to maintain water quality (for example, to kill germs). Each year, however, mishandling pool chemicals when treating public or residential/backyard pools, hot tubs/spas, and water playgrounds leads to 3,000–5,000 visits to U.S. emergency departments.
    For more info, visit CDCs Pool Chemical Info.

    Illnesses caused by the germs in pools, hot tubs/spas, and water playgrounds:
    During 2000–2014, nearly 500 outbreaks were linked to pools, hot tubs/spas, and water playgrounds. Most of the outbreaks were caused by germs Cryptosporidium (or “Crypto”), Legionella, or Pseudomonas. Healthy swimming is not just about the steps pool operators and pool inspectors take—so let’s all do our part to help keep ourselves, our families, and our friends healthy.
    For more info, visit CDCs Healthy Swimming Info.

    Drowning:
    Each day, two children younger than 14 years old die from drowning. Drowning is a leading cause of death for children 1–4 years old. we want to remind you about drowning prevention. Drowning is the leading cause of accidental injury or death in children under the age of 5. Drowning can be quick and silent. It's a fallacy that the act of drowning is accompanies by screams or splashing, making proactive prevention crucial. To help prevent drownings, please remember to have active adult supervision, never swim alone, make sure your pool is fenced with self-closing/latching gates, and most of all keep a Pool / Lifeguard First Aid Kit on hand.
    For more info, visit CDCs Water Injuries Info.

    Harmful algal blooms:
    Algae can grow in warm, nutrient-rich fresh- and marine water. An abundant growth of algae that harms people or animals is referred to as a harmful algal bloom (HAB). HABs in fresh- and marine water can produce toxins that cause a variety of symptoms including skin irritation, coughing, sneezing, diarrhea, stomach pain, numbness, and dizziness. Symptoms vary depending on the type of HAB toxin and the type of exposure, such as skin contact, ingestion by eating food or drinking water contaminated with HAB toxins, or breathing in tiny droplets or mist contaminated with HAB toxins.
    For more info, visit CDCs HAB Toxin Info

    Naegleria fowleri “the brain-eating ameba”:
    Naegleria fowleri is a microscopic ameba (a singlecelled living organism) that is commonly found in warm freshwater such as in lakes, rivers, and hot springs. If water containing the ameba goes up the nose forcefully, the ameba can invade and cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM).
    For more info, visit CDCs Naegleria Info

  • How Healthy is Your Home Town?

    Where you live affects your health in many ways - the climate, the air quality, even the lifestyles of those around you can influence your own habits and health...

    500-cities-logoThe CDC and its partners released a website that provides first-of-its-kind, neighborhood-level health data for the 500 largest US cities. The 500 Cities project provides data on 5 risk behaviors, 13 health outcomes, and 9 prevention practices for the most common, costly, and preventable chronic diseases.  Health professionals can view data by city or census tract, explore the interactive map, get map books for individual cities, and compare cities to identify emerging health problems and plan effective interventions. Learn more about the 500 Cities Project.

  • CDC Updates Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women

    CDC-HANCDC Updates Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women and Women of Reproductive Age for Zika Virus Infection Related to the Ongoing Investigation of Local Mosquito-borne Zika Virus Transmission in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    CDC previously issued travel, testing, and other guidance related to local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission (active Zika virus transmission) that the Florida Department of Health (FL DOH) identified in two areas of Miami-Dade County: (1) a one-square-mile area in Wynwood, and (2) a 1.5-square-mile area in Miami Beach. CDC has updated the guidance for people who live in or traveled to these areas.
    CDC-Health-UpdateFL DOH continues to investigate active Zika virus transmission in South Florida. Investigation has shown an expanded area of active transmission in Miami Beach, now measuring 4.5 square miles, which includes the original 1.5-square-mile area.
    Learn More »

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