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Bloodbirne Pathogens

  • What to do if Exposed to Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials

    IF AN EXPOSURE OCCURS

    Two types of exposures include a superficial exposure, and an exposure incident. A superficial exposure may involve blood or OPIM coming into contact with an individual’s intact skin. An exposure incident means that blood or OPIM have entered the body through the skin
    or mucous membranes. Although there have been no reported cases of infected blood transmitting disease through intact skin, you should treat both types of exposure with caution.

    blood-in-vessel• Once you have removed your PPE, thoroughly wash your hands and all other affected body parts with anti-bacterial soap and warm water.

    • If your eyes are exposed, flush thoroughly with a constant stream of moving water for approximately 15 minutes.

    • Do not allow runoff to drain into the other eye or into any open wounds or mucous membranes.

    • Do not eat, smoke, or touch your face until you have removed all PPE and completely cleaned all exposed skin surfaces.

    • If you suspect that contaminated blood or OPIM have entered your bloodstream, wash the affected area thoroughly, then immediately seek medical attention.

    • Finally, make sure that any exposure is reported to your supervisor and the Human Resources Dept. This is an important step in controlling the spread of the pathogen, and in providing medical evaluation and counseling to an exposed individual.

    • A medical evaluation usually involves testing the exposed individual’s blood for antibodies. The results of these tests are kept confidential, even from the employer.

    If there is a spill of blood or OPIM in the workplace that does not involve exposure to any individuals, sterilize the contaminated area with a mixture of 1:10 bleach and water.

    Follow the concepts of Universal Precautions when cleaning and sterilizing a spill site. This includes:
    • The use of proper PPE and tools,
    • Proper disposal techniques, and
    • Reporting the incident to a supervisor.

    From Bodily Fluid Cleanup and Personal Protection, to Safe disposal of  items contaminated with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) - We've got you covered!From Bodily Fluid Cleanup and Personal Protection, to Safe disposal of items contaminated with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) - We've got you covered!

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  • PPE for BBP

    While Employers have a responsibility to provide bloodborne pathogen safety training when exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials exists in the workplace (even when only as part of a collateral duty, like performing CPR or First Aid) and the further obligation to provide personal protective equipment for guarding against exposure - Employees have an obligation, too.

    See all types of PPE for BBP! See all types of PPE for BBP!

    Employees have the responsibility of using PPE whenever the possibility of exposure to blood or body fluids exists. This equipment must not allow blood or OPIM to pass through to the employee’s clothes, skin, eyes, or mouth.

    • When handling materials or individuals contaminated with blood or OPIM, rubber gloves must be worn. Hypoallergenic gloves must be made available for individuals with allergic reactions to latex products.

    • Single-use gloves must be replaced as soon as possible after they have been contaminated or if they become torn or punctured.

    • Latex or rubber gloves should never be washed for reuse.

    • Rubber gloves are not sufficient protection for the handling of contaminated sharp objects such as needles or broken glass. For these functions, use heavy gloves, tongs, or other appropriate equipment that eliminates the risk of puncture and exposure.

    Other examples of personal protective equipment can include:

    • PLASTIC VISORS

    • HALF-FACE MASKS

    • FULL BODY SUIT/GOWN

    • EYE GOGGLES

    • CPR MASKS

    The type and amount of Personal Protective Equipment used should be appropriate to the exposure risk. Although your employer is responsible for providing you with PPE, it is your responsibility as an employee to:
    • Use PPE correctly and whenever necessary,
    • Inform your employer of any PPE improvements that you feel must be made to ensure your safety on the job.

  • Bloodborne Pathogen standard (29 CFR 1910.1030)

    The Bloodborne Pathogen standard (29 CFR 1910.1030) referred to in this literature is a performance-oriented standard, in that OSHA states what the required standards are and then allows the employer to “craft the most protective and cost effective programs possible.”

    BioThe Bloodborne Pathogen Standard affects any employee who may come into contact with blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM). The Standard is regulated by OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It requires safety practices to be implemented and followed by employers and employees to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace.

    Bloodborne Pathogens are microorganisms that exist in blood and other bodily fluids, and can cause disease in humans. They include the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B (HBV), and Hepatitis C (HCV). Each of these diseases can be fatal, and each can be avoided by observing the concept of Universal Precautions.

    The Standard affects any employee who may come in contact with human blood or OPIM. Some identified populations at risk include workers in: Funeral Homes, Industrial Facilities, Research Labs, Linen Services, Law Enforcement, Fire and Rescue Operations, Waste Removal, Lifesaving, Personnel Services, and any employee whose job designation requires them to render first aid, even as a collateral duty..

    Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM):
    OPIM includes semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, or any other body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, or where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids.

    EMPLOYER RESPONSIBILITIES:
    1. Develop a written Exposure Control Plan designed to:

    a.) Identify employees or tasks at risk, and...
    b.) Document a schedule of implementation.

    2. Develop Engineering Controls designed to:
    Reduce or eliminate the risk of exposure to bloodborne disease. (Engineering Controls are controls (e.g., biohazard bags, sharps disposal containers, self-sheathing needles) that isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace).

    3. Provide Personal Protective Equipment.
    (PPE) is specialized clothing or equipment worn or used by an employee for protection against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts, or blouses) are not considered to be personal protective equipment. (Learn about Universal Precautions)

    4. Offer training in and monitoring of proper work practices
    Work Practice Controls are controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure by altering the manner in which a task is performed (e.g., prohibiting the disposal of blood soaked material in unmarked trash receptacles).

    5. Develop procedures to evaluate circumstances
    surrounding Exposure Incidents.
    An “Exposure Incident” means a specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or piercing contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that results from the performance of an employee’s duties.

    6. Offer the Hepatitis B (HBV) vaccine to all employees with
    designated exposure risk.
    Employees who have been designated as having “Occupational
    Exposure” are given the opportunity to be vaccinated for the
    Hepatitis B virus. The vaccination will be given at no charge to the
    employee.

    7. Provide labels and signs.
    Labels must identify:

    a) Containers used to store, transport, ship
    or dispose of blood or other potentially infectious material.
    b) Contaminated equipment
    & Signs must be posted at entrances to research labs or production facilities where a person could come into contact with an infectious agent.

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    BLOODBORNE PATHOGEN PRODUCTS

    Bloodborne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. Any type of sharp objects such as needles can expose you or your co-workers to these bloodborne pathogens. To limit you and your co-workers from potentially infectious materials we have Bloodborne protection and personal protection kits plus supplies to protect you from harmful and infectious materials. We have every type of antimicrobial, germicide, barrier making, disinfectant, and PPE product that you can dream of. We are here to block and protect you from any infectious material or critter that is out there and to make sure you keep safe at home or in your work place.

    From Bodily Fluid Cleanup and Personal Protection, to Safe disposal of items contaminated with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) - We've got you covered! From Bodily Fluid Cleanup and Personal Protection, to Safe disposal of items contaminated with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) - We've got you covered!
  • Universal Precautions

    What are Universal Precautions?

    See our Bloodborne Pathogen & Personal Protection Products See our Bloodborne Pathogen & Personal Protection Products

    Universal Precautions is an approach to infection control. Universal precautions should be taken in all forms of lifesaving actions and medical care, including rendering CPR and First Aid, or using an AED.

    According to the concept of Universal Precautions, all human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HCV, and other bloodborne pathogens.

    This means that precautionary methods should be used every time the potential for exposure to blood is present, even if you know the injured person, and even if the person looks healthy.

    Universal Precautions means:

    EVERY TIME… WITH EVERYBODY!

    From Bodily Fluid Cleanup and Personal Protection, to Safe disposal of items contaminated with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) - We've got you covered! From Bodily Fluid Cleanup and Personal Protection, to Safe disposal of items contaminated with Blood or Other Potentially Infectious Materials (OPIM) - We've got you covered!

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