Welcome to AmericanCPR.com!

Image of Google+ icon signifying a link to Google+ page Image of Twitter icon signifying a link to Twitter page Image of YouTube icon signifying a link to YouTube page Image of Facebook icon signifying a link to Facebook page

American CPR

  • Are You at High Risk for Serious Illness from Flu?

    According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) certain groups are more susceptible to the Flu becoming a serious health risk...

    The Flu Can Be Serious

    Influenza, commonly called the "flu," is a contagious viral infection that affects the respiratory system—your nose, throat and lungs. Symptoms of the flu can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people may also have vomiting and diarrhea.

    Flu activity is low in the United States, but CDC has received reports of early outbreaks in institutions across the country. Most of these outbreaks have been attributed to H3N2 viruses. Flu causes millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations and thousands of deaths every season.

    Cough & Cold remedies Cough & Cold remedies

    The CDC says that Children younger than 5 (but especially children younger than 2 years old,) Adults 65 years of age and older, Pregnant women (and women up to two weeks postpartum,) Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, and American / Alaskan Native Americans have higher risk.

    Further, the CDC explains that people who have certain chronic medical conditions such as Asthma, Neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions [including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy (seizure disorders), stroke, intellectual disability (mental retardation), moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury] may be higher risk. Also, individuals with Chronic lung disease (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and cystic fibrosis), Heart disease (such as congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease)
    Blood disorders (such as sickle cell disease), Endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus), Kidney disorders, Liver disorders, Metabolic disorders (such as inherited metabolic disorders and mitochondrial disorders), Weakened immune system due to disease or medication (such as people with HIV or AIDS, or cancer, or those on chronic steroids) need take special precautions.

    People younger than 19 years of age who are receiving aspirin therapy and People with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or greater are also at special elevated risk of Flu and complications.

    Flu-Related Complications Can Affect You

    Millions of Americans are impacted by chronic health conditions, but many people aren't aware that they have these conditions. For example, diabetes affects about 29 million Americans, but it is estimated that 1 in 4 people with the disease don't even know they have it. It's important to ask your doctor whether you have a health condition that makes you more vulnerable to complications from the flu. In addition to those with chronic health conditions, many others are at high risk for flu complications because of their age or other factors.

    Consider these facts:

    During the 2014-2015 flu season, about half of adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza had heart disease.
    In pregnant women, changes in the immune system, heart and lungs make them prone to more severe illness from flu. In addition, a flu-infected pregnant woman also has an increased chance of miscarriage or preterm birth.
    In the United States, each year an average of 20,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized because of flu complications.
    As reported during the 2014-2015 flu season, 146 children died from flu-related causes.
    Past data indicate that 80-85% of flu-related deaths in children 6 months and older, occurred in children who had not received a flu vaccine.

    In recent years, it's estimated that between 80 and 90% of seasonal flu-related deaths have occurred in people 65 years and older, and between 50 and 70%of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations have occurred among people in that age group. If you are currently living with a chronic health condition like heart disease, diabetes or asthma, certain behaviors are probably part of your daily routine, like watching your diet or glucose levels, taking your prescribed medications or keeping your inhaler on-hand. Make an annual flu vaccination another part of your health management routine—it's your best defense against the flu and its related complications. Since the flu is contagious, it's also important that all of your close contacts are vaccinated.

    If you are at high risk for flu complications, be sure to ask your doctor about getting a pneumococcal vaccination to prevent pneumonia, which is a possible complication of flu illness. Pneumococcal vaccine can be given at any time during the year and may be given at the same time as the flu vaccine.

    The CDC FluView report provides weekly influenza surveillance information in the United States. These applications were developed to enhance the weekly FluView report by better facilitating communication about influenza with the public health community, clinicians, scientists, and the general public. This series of dynamic visualizations allow any Internet user to access influenza information collected by CDC’s monitoring systems. The CDC FluView report provides weekly influenza surveillance information in the United States. These applications were developed to enhance the weekly FluView report by better facilitating communication about influenza with the public health community, clinicians, scientists, and the general public. This series of dynamic visualizations allow any Internet user to access influenza information collected by CDC’s monitoring systems.
  • It’s Time to Prepare for Winter Weather

    Get Prepared for Winter Weather

    Brrr! Cooler temperatures are setting in, which means winter is on its way. Before winter weather hits your area, talk with your family about how to stay safe and take action to get prepared! Planning and preparing can help you manage the impact of severe winter weather.

    The How to Prepare for a Winter Storm guide from America’s PrepareAthon! outlines steps you can take now, including:

    • • Gather emergency supplies;
    • • Make a family emergency communication plan;
    • • Install battery-powered or battery back-up carbon monoxide detectors;
    • • If you have access to an outside generator, have an electric cord long enough to keep the generator at least 20 feet from any door, window, or vent;
    • • NEVER use a generator inside your home or in any partially enclosed area; and
    • • Be alert to changing weather conditions using local alerts, battery-operated radios, and other news sources for information and instructions.

    Winter-StormTo learn more about preparing for winter weather, take a look at this animated video, and see what to do “When the Sky Turns Gray.”

  • CPR Training, AED Courses, First Aid Classes and 100's of other OSHA Safety Training Topics

    americas-favoriteWhy take the long, boring, expensive safety classes? American CPR Training™ offers lifesaving lessons in an accelerated format at your location (training at work, home, you name it - we come to you!) using the knowledge of the industry's leading professionals, presented in an entertaining and informative manner. Our OSHA Safety Training classes are offered in a "corporate style", streamlined format ~ designed to comply with most current OSHA, ECC and other National regulations, yet still saving time and money by cutting out unnecessary breaks and video time. First Aid Training, CPR Courses , AED, BBP + 100 other safety topics!

    ½ the Time, ½ the Price, and TWICE the Fun!™

  • CPR Saves Lives, But Only When Performed

    CPR is Easy - CPR Saves Lives - CPR is NOT what you saw on Baywatch.

    Learn CPR now. There are many ways:

    Sudden Cardiac Arrest can lead to death in 4-6 minutes... step in, be a hero, Save a Life A.C.T. Now!™

    CPR has been around since the 1700s, but most Americans don’t know how to perform it. CPR and AEDs. ~Patch

    Performed properly and immediately to sudden cardiac arrest victims, CPR can save lives. The use of the technique dates back to 1740, but even today, most Americans don’t know how to perform CPR, the American Heart Association says.

    While we're at it - why not brush up on your First Aid Skills? You can take a class, or watch our FREE First Aid Video!

    american-cpr-training-ad

  • Fewer Kids Without Healthcare

    Percentage of Children and Adolescents Aged 0–17 Years with No Usual Place of Health Care, by Race and Hispanic Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 1997–2014

    While many have "issues" with our National Healthcare programs, some statistics show improvements - especially where our children are concerned...

    During 2012–2014, 3.9% of children and adolescents aged 0–17 years had no usual place of health care compared with 6.7% during 1997–1999. From 1997–1999 to 2012–2014 the percentage of children and adolescents with no usual place of care declined for Hispanics (from 13.6% to 6.4%) and non-Hispanic blacks (from 8.1% to 3.8%). The change for non-Hispanic whites from 4.4% during 1997–1999 to 2.7% during 2012–2014 was not statistically significant. Hispanic children and adolescents were more likely than non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black children and adolescents to have no usual place of health care during 1997–2014. Read more at the CDC.

    The figure above is a line chart showing that during 2012-2014, 3.9% of children and adolescents aged 0-17 years had no usual place of health care compared with 6.7% during 1997-1999. From 1997-1999 to 2012-2014 the percentage of children and adolescents with no usual place of care declined for Hispanics (from 13.6% to 6.4%) and non-Hispanic blacks (from 8.1% to 3.8%). The change for non-Hispanic whites from 4.4% during 1997-1999 to 2.7% during 2012-2014 was not statistically significant. Hispanic children and adolescents were more likely than non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black children and adolescents to have no usual place of health care during 1997-2014. The figure above is a line chart showing that during 2012-2014, 3.9% of children and adolescents aged 0-17 years had no usual place of health care compared with 6.7% during 1997-1999. From 1997-1999 to 2012-2014 the percentage of children and adolescents with no usual place of care declined for Hispanics (from 13.6% to 6.4%) and non-Hispanic blacks (from 8.1% to 3.8%). The change for non-Hispanic whites from 4.4% during 1997-1999 to 2.7% during 2012-2014 was not statistically significant. Hispanic children and adolescents were more likely than non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black children and adolescents to have no usual place of health care during 1997-2014.
  • Bloodborne Pathogens Training Certification

    BBP-IconBloodborne Certification is effective for 1-2 years. Where Bloodborne Pathogen Prevention and Universal Precaution certification is required as part of daily job risks (Healthcare, Housekeeping, Tattooing) the renewal training and certification should take place annually. In auxiliary, where the training is provided in conjunction with bystander CPR and/or First aid training, renewal with these certification every two years (or less) is adequate, although interim refresher training is always recommended.

    Corporate American CPR™ Certification cards state the renewal date should be in two years. Materials purchased by Independent instructors have a blank issue date for the instructor to assign as 1 year or 2 year. While corporate issues it for two years - that does not override the necessary renewal renewal of one year.

    Per the American CPR™ Instructor Manual, we recommend that it is renewed yearly (page 122): "This information and training must be provided annually to all employees who may have occupational exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens. Also, all new employees and employees who are transferred from one department or area to another must be given this training if their new position will expose them to Bloodborne Pathogens in new or different ways".

    How do I know if my client needs one year certification or two year certification?

    BBP training will depend on the state and the organization/work regulations. We recommend you discuss this with the organization you are certifying. There are also state guidelines available online, and you can always call the Instructor Coordinators at ACT™ for additional support and guidance.

    Bloodborne pathogen spill kits and protective products Bloodborne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. Any type of sharp objects such as needles can expose you or your co-workers to these bloodborne pathogens. To limit you and your co-workers from potentially infectious materials we have Bloodborne protection and personal protection kits plus supplies to protect you from harmful and infectious materials. We have every type of antimicrobial, germicide, barrier making, disinfectant, PPE product that you can dream of. We are here to block and protect you from any infectious material or critter that is out there and to make sure you keep safe at home or in your work place.
  • New CPR Guidelines

    cprman-animatedThe newest ILCOR / ECC CPR guidelines stick with the same overall order of action, rates, ratios, and depths as the significantly updated 2010 guidelines set, but lay greater emphasis on how quick action, proper CPR training, utilizing readily available CPR technology and coordinated efforts can increase survival from cardiac arrest.

    Quick assessment

    The basic steps in preparation for CPR stay the same. Check for unresponsiveness and send someone for an AED if one is not already present on the scene.

    Compressions first

    Initiate chest compressions following the C.A.R.E. CPR™ approach. If a defibrillator is not already on the scene or on the way, the lone rescuer should leave the patient before initiating chest compressions in order to retrieve the device.

    30 compressions to 2 ventilations

    New guidelines still recommend delivery of chest compressions and assisted ventilation at a rate of 30 chest compressions for every two assisted ventilations, beginning with chest compressions.

     

    Hand position

    Rescuers should compress on the lower half of the sternum in the adult patient.

    Rate of compressions

    The 2010 recommendations altered language from previous years to identify more accurately the minimum rate of chest compressions necessary. Those guidelines recommended a rate of at least 100 chest compressions per minute. Although no new evidence contradicts that recommendation, there is for the first time a recommendation on an upper limit of chest compression rate beyond which survival may be negatively affected. Two studies suggest survival may be improved if rescuers can keep the rate of chest compressions between 100 and 120 per minute. In both studies, survival rates fell when rescuers compressed at a rate above 120 compressions per minute. New recommendations suggest that rescuers attempt to compress at a rate faster than 100 but less than 120 compressions per minute. As many rescuers tend to compress at rates above 120 compressions per minute,

    Depth of compressions

    As important as rate is compression depth. The 2010 guidelines altered previous language to stress the need for deeper chest compressions. In those guidelines, the ECC recommended that rescuers push to a depth of at least two inches. Since publication of the 2010 guidelines, the largest study to date to address this question demonstrated that rescuers who compressed between 1.61 inches and 2.2 inches survival rates optimized survival rates. Although not necessarily affecting survival, another study suggested that compression depths greater than 2.4 inches increase the rate of patient injury. After assessing this new information, the new ILCOR / ECC guidelines now recommend that rescuers compress to a depth of at least two inches, but avoid compressing too deeply beyond 2.4 inches.

    Key points from the 2015 Guidelines Update provides bystanders, dispatchers and communities with practical guidance to improve the effectiveness of their teamwork:

    • Untrained bystanders should still call 911 and provide Hands-Only CPR, or CPR without breaths, pushing hard and fast in the center of the chest to the rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. However, if the bystander is trained in CPR and can perform breaths, he or she should add breaths in a 30:2 compressions-to-breaths ratio.
    • Bystanders should use mobile phones to immediately call 911, placing the phones on speaker, so the dispatcher can help bystanders check for breathing, get the precise location and provide instructions for performing CPR.
    • Dispatchers should be trained to help bystanders check for breathing and recognize cardiac arrest. Dispatchers should also be aware that brief generalized seizures may be an early sign of cardiac arrest.
    • Mobile dispatch systems that notify potential rescuers of a nearby presumed cardiac arrest can improve the rate of bystander CPR and shorten the time to first chest compressions.Communities may want to consider this service to improve the chain of survival.
  • Movember

    Mustache Bandages - 15 Per Tin - Accoutrements Mustache Bandages - 15 Per Tin - Accoutrements

    What is Movember?

    According to Wikipedia, Movember (a portmanteau of the Australian-English diminutive word for moustache, "mo", and "November") is an annual event involving the growing of moustaches during the month of November to raise awareness of men's health issues, such as depression in men, prostate cancer and other male cancers, and associated  charities. The Movember Foundation runs the Movember charity event, housed at Movember.com

    moustacheThis Movember, take the MOVE Challenge.

    ~ Sign up to MOVE every day for 30 days this Movember.
    ~ Get moving! Big or small, any kind of physical activity counts.
    ~ Raise funds for men's health. Help yourself, help others – it's win-win.

    The challenge: MOVE every day in Movember

    Take a 30 minute walk to work, play a game of ping pong or go on an epic bike ride – no MOVE is too big or small.

    Sign up for Movember 2015 to get started.

  • OSHA Requirements for Forklift Training

    OSHA Requirements for Industrial Lift Truck / Forklift Safety Training are "Site Specific", meaning that the training must be performed on your equipment, at your facility. Therefore, individual training is impractical, because the training still must occur at your place of business / employment, where you will actually be utilizing the equipment.

    So, although we CAN perform individual training for OSHA Forklift Safety, you must still pay for a minimum group fee in order to cover the time and expense of sending an Instructor, materials, and equipment to your site.

    What is Forklift Safety?

    The Forklift Safety Training will include OSHA safety regulations on training, operation, loading, inspection, & refueling/recharging. Training may also include special modules on: "People and Equipment”, "Propane Safety”, “Battery Charging Safety”, or “Carbon Monoxide Safety.”

    Does this training include an operating license?

    No, this is only a Forklift Safety course which is still required once you have an operating license.

    How long is the certification valid for?

    The certification is valid for 3 years. However, if there is an incident or change of equipment at your site, this must be recorded and Forklift Safety is required to be retaken.

281-289 of 289

Page:
  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 25
  4. 26
  5. 27
  6. 28
  7. 29