Welcome to AmericanCPR.com!

Image of Google+ icon signifying a link to Google+ page Image of Twitter icon signifying a link to Twitter page Image of YouTube icon signifying a link to YouTube page Image of Facebook icon signifying a link to Facebook page

American CPR

  • American

    flagfadeHow can an organization with our name not proudly recognize this day?
    Today day is Flag Day, an officially unofficial holiday commemorating the adoption of the US Flag by the Second Continental Congress. While proclaimed initially in 1916 by Woodrow Wilson, and every year since by each President then-in-office, and even recognized by Congress 70 years ago - it is still not a "real" holiday, meaning Federal workers do not get the day off, and it must be proclaimed each year by the executive office - or it won't exist.  Interesting, eh?

    What does the flag symbolize?

    The 50 stars represent the number of states - this has changed, obviously over the years.
    The colors represent:

    • Red - Hardiness and Valor
    • White - Purity and Innocence
    • Blue - Vigilance, Perseverance and Justice.

    ACPR-FLAG_LogoFlat

  • Protecting Disabled Employees

    Staying Safe: Protecting Disabled Employees at Work

    The health and safety of disabled employees at work is extremely important. An easily accessible and safe workplace for disabled people will ultimately prove to be a safer and easily accessible place for all employees, clients and visitors.

    The term ‘accessibility’ does not necessarily mean just access to the buildings. In a work environment, it also refers to the ease with which disabled workers can move independently and safely around the entire premises.

    The Work Environment

    If the existing design of the work site does not accommodate the special needs of disabled employees, adjustments must be made. These modifications will help disabled workers move around the premises safely and easily.

    • It is necessary to adjust workstations and buildings by installing ramps, lifts, gripping bars, gradual steps, special lighting, warning strips, warning audio systems, automatically opening doors, doorbells and handles. It is necessary to install entry devices and switches at lower heights, reachable by wheelchair uses. It is also important to remove slippery flooring and tiles.
    • It is possible to assign disabled workers to a specific work area that may be easier for them to access, like the ground floor.
    • Color contrasts in paint, walls, doors, carpets and floors will help disabled employees move around the premises easily. Signboards in large, clear print or Braille directions will help partially sighted or visually impaired employees. Signboards must also have a matte finish to avoid reflection, for easier reading and comprehension. Providing pictures and graphics by door handles is a good option for those with learning disabilities.
    • Modifying work equipment by installing Braille keyboards and hands-free phones is a good option to cater to the visually impaired. Providing a reader/interpreter during meetings and occasions will help the hearing impaired.
    • All health and safety information must be provided in accessible formats to workers with visual or hearing impairments, dyslexia, learning disabilities or psychiatric disorders.
    • To cater to the needs of disabled workers with musculoskeletal upper limb disorder, it is a good idea to install voice recognition software on the computers.

    To avoid renovating workplaces and incurring additional costs later, it is best to incorporate these adjustments at the design and planning stage itself.

    Training and Supervising

    Adequate measures must be taken to ensure that disabled workers are not disadvantaged when it comes to health and safety training and instructions. Traditional modes of communication do not work when it comes to disabled employees.

    • Communicating the information or providing the materials through different mediums like Braille, large print, text form and simple audio recordings will aid in better understanding.
    • Providing individual training tailored to their needs and capabilities will help in ensuring they understand.
    • Providing Occupational Health and Safety Training specific to employee needs on campus is important since different people have different disabilities.
    • Providing specially trained managers and staff to evacuate disabled workers in case of an emergency by using special evacuation equipment will help support disabled employees.

    Employers must ensure that the health and safety of disabled workers are main priorities and that designated staff provide support whenever necessary. Disability organizations also help companies devise innovative ways to communicate information to disabled employees.

    Handling Emergencies

    All workplaces need to know how to support disabled workers in case of an emergency. Proper evacuation procedures must be in place for evacuating the disabled workers fast, if required. Companies must purchase special evacuation equipment and provide proper and accessible storage areas for them. Trained members of the staff assigned to help and alert disabled workers in case of evacuation must know basic sign language. Escape routes must be clearly established and made known to all the employees.

    Vibrating, visual devices and lighted fire strobes are supplemental systems to the traditional, audible alarms that help alert disabled employees. Installing alarms in all possible areas including restrooms is important. Individually training all disabled workers in the health and safety norms of the workplace, evacuation procedures and escape routes is important so that they will not be entirely helpless in case of an emergency.

    Disabled employees must also submit details regarding their medication and medical equipment, allergies, names and phone numbers of family members and doctors.

    The work site must have basic medical supplies and first aid kits, gloves, and more - learn your specific needs.

    Consultation

    Employers can consult local fire stations, police and rescue departments to find out what disabled workers need to do in case of an emergency; if they need to remain where they are and wait to be rescued or evacuated immediately.

    Consulting the disabled employees themselves about their former experiences reveals valuable input that employers may not know otherwise. Procedures adopted without consulting the disabled workers may miss important information.

    Health and Safety

    Measures designed to protect employees from harm must not be used in a discriminatory way against the disabled workers by treating them less favorably than the rest. For example, employers must not claim that wheelchair users cannot escape from a building in an emergency or that a hearing-impaired worker cannot hear and respond to a fire alarm.

    Employers need to do a risk assessment of the workplace and determine what measures can be taken to accommodate the disabled workers.

    Assessing the Workplace for Risk

    Risk assessment involves examining the workplace for what could cause harm to the disabled employees, to judge whether existing precautions are sufficient or not. The objective is to identify potential hazards and evaluate them to determine the extent of risk involved. If the risk is great, appropriate preventive measures are adopted to ensure future safety of the disabled employees.

    Workers and employers alike must work together to improve the condition of a workplace, ensuring that it promotes equal opportunities and reasonable accommodation for all disabled individuals, whether employees or visitors. Needs of disabled people must be considered at the design and construction stage itself, rather than waiting for a disabled person to be employed and then making necessary adjustments.

    disabled-employees

  • How To Prevent Accidents Through Workplace Wellness Initiatives

    Every year, thousands of workers are killed or injured in workplace accidents. In 2012, about 3.8 million workers had a nonfatal workplace injury or illness, according to The National Institute for Occupation Safety and Health (NIOSH). According to the U.S. Department of Labor, almost 4,700 workers were killed on the job in 2014.

    NIOSH estimates that lost wages, workman’s comp, insurance and medical expenses add up to $192 billion, annually. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median number of days away from work to recuperate from workplace injury was eight days in 2013, and there were 109 incidents that required time away from work for every 10,000 workers. Clearly, the workplace can be dangerous — and costly.

    OSHA regulations include specific requirements for safety in every industry or type of workplace. One area of particular interest: musculoskeletal disorders, can be caused by repetitive motions, improper lifting, or poorly designed tools and workplaces. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) include carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, rotator cuff (shoulder) injuries, epicondylitis (elbow), trigger finger and muscle strains or low back injuries.

    While OSHA has defined specific regulations for industries in which workers are particularly susceptible to MSDs, it also issues general guidelines that apply to all industries, including:

    ? Provide management support
    ? Involve workers
    ? Provide training
    ? Identify problems
    ? Encourage early reporting of MSD symptoms
    ? Implement solutions to control hazards
    ? Evaluate progress

    OSHA cites numerous independent studies that evaluated the effect of workplace wellness initiatives on the rate of injuries. One such study showed that effective workplace safety programs increased productivity by 43 percent and reduced costs by 28 percent. There were additional favorable outcomes affecting employee morale and retention. Additional research shows that state-mandated programs have highly positive effects. For example, Alaska mandated safety and wellness programs in 1973, and workplace injuries and illnesses decreased more than 17 percent. Hawaii showed a reduction of 20.7 percent. In addition, Massachusetts companies enjoyed a 20.8 percent improvement in loss ratios due to injury and illness. The evidence is staggering — workplace wellness initiatives work.

    Effective Workplace Wellness Initiatives

    One of the most effective parts of workplace wellness programs involves implementing solutions to prevent or reduce MSDs. OSHA recommends a three-phase program:

    Engineering Controls

    Engineering controls include making physical changes to the workplace that can reduce or eliminate hazards. This might include redesigning tools to enable neutral postures, repositioning a worktable to eliminate excessive reach, or offering easily adjustable ergonomic chairs or stools — so employees can work comfortably without strain.

    Administrative and Work Practice Controls

    By establishing efficient processes and procedures, the company eliminates excess or repetitive motions that can cause injury. Examples of these controls might include rotating employees to different tasks at regular intervals, or implementing a preventive maintenance program to ensure that tools work easily and are in good repair. Educating employees on how to protect themselves with proper position for the task at hand can also be effective.

    Personal Protective Equipment

    Employers have an obligation to provide personal protective equipment that reduces the risk of MSDs. This might include gloves, wrist braces or padding. It could also encompass ensuring that the employee has control over the arrangement of items on the work surface, the height of the desk or workstation, and appropriate adjustable seating.

    Workplace Wellness Initiatives are Good Business

    Not only does a workplace wellness initiative make sense from a business perspective, having an effective program in place is mandatory in most states for a wide range of industries. Most European countries have similar mandates, as do many countries in Asia Pacific and South America. If you’re interested in starting a workplace wellness program for your business, there are numerous sources for information and advice available from government, private and institutional sources.

    The U.S. government agencies involved in monitoring workplace safety work closely with the American National Standards Institute and the American Industrial Hygiene Association. Your company insurance provider may also have excellent insight into the best solutions to adopt in your industry or environment.

    Also read: Back and Lifting SafetyCarpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS), and Safety at Work 

    Author Bio:

    Joel Vento is the head of marketing and sales at Concept Seating, manufacturer of ergonomic seating. Joel has over 20 years of experience in the seating industry. Mr. Vento headed the design team that designed the 3150 chair. Joel has a BS in Journalism from the University of Wisconsin Madison. Concept Seating produces a variety products like office task chairs and 24-hour dispatch chairs.Workplace Wellness

  • Puppies

    PuppyHere's an interesting twist... a novel way that Humane Societies around the world can get homeless pets some love and attention (and hopefully bonding and adoption!)

    Want to try out owning a puppy for a few hours all while enjoying a vacation on a tropical island? According to Huffington Post, a dog rescue charity in Turks and Caicos, Potcake Place, says that the program has been quite successful at getting the playful pooches adopted by tourists and locals alike. In addition to the adoption rate success, the playtime also serves as socialization training for the pups. If you're jumping on a plane now to head down there,

    PetFirstAidKitsjust keep in mind to get there early as this program is extremely popular. The lines start as early as 8:30am for the 10am opening.

    You always want to protect and make sure your family is safe. This also includes the furry, four-legged family members. We have everything you need to make sure you can help your sick or injured pets (dogs, cats, horses, etc.) with our pet emergency first aid and supply products. Our kits are designed for handling minor first aid emergencies and stabilize them until you can reach a vet for treatment. With brands such as Me-Ow, Bow-Ow, Sporting Dog, Mayday and more, you know you are set to help your furry family friends!

    DID YOU KNOW? Besides having a pet first aid and emergency kit to help out our furry friends in a time of an emergency, did you know you could sign up and take a Pet First Aid and CPR class? One out of four pets would survive if just one pet first aid technique was applied prior to getting emergency veterinary care, according to the American Animal Hospital Association. Having an emergency pet first aid kit and knowing how to properly use it can be two different things. Ask your vet where the closest Pet First Aid classes are and sign up!

  • NEW ANSI 2015 WORKPLACE FIRST AID GUIDELINES

    WHY YOUR FIRST AID KIT NEEDS AN UPGRADE OR REPLACEMENT:

    American National Standard

    Minimum requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies Z308.1-2015

    Image displaying a 25 Person ANSI Class A First Aid Kit with Plastic CaseThe minimum requirements for workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies guidelines were approved to go into effect on June 17th, 2015 by the American National Standards Institute, Inc (ANSI). They decided to establish two classes of specific first aid kits,  Class A and Class B. These kits have been classified into four types- depending on the work setting and ensuring that each kit contained both a variety and an adequate supply of the essential items needed to deal with the most common types of injuries and/or illnesses that could occur at a workplace.

    • Class A kits are considered more basic for most general settings.
    • Class B kits have a larger variety of items and extra supply for workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific.

    Both kits have room for additional customizing. 2009 standards have been preserved for both class types, including the requirement of having scissors in both kits. A splint and a tourniquet are both required to be included in a class B kit. A splint by definition is a device used to immobilize body parts. A tourniquet by definition is a tight, wide band placed around an arm or a leg to constrict blood in order to stop flow through an artery. Pairing your kit with first aid training with better prepare the workplace to assist in case of an emergency.

    Image displaying a 50 Person ANSI Class B Contractor First Aid Kit with Metal CaseAnother variation of the standard requirements to be included is that the first aid kit containers be practical in regard to the workplace. The kits have been classified into four types. Type I kits are considered to be geared towards the general office settings, manufacturing facility or basic indoor use where there are no real high risk areas. These kits must have the ability to be mounted. Type II kits are to be transportable for indoor settings with no real “rough-handling” or equivalent to Type I kit environments. Type III kits are to be transportable, for both indoor and outdoor uses, and with the ability to be mounted. Common environments include both general indoor use and protected outdoor use. Type IV first aid Kits are Type II heavy and are to have a water resistance seal for added protection. Industries recommended to have these types of kits included the utility, transportation, construction and the armed forces.

    General requirements include the following items: Adhesive bandages, adhesive tape, antibiotic application, antiseptic, a breathing barrier, burn dressing (gel soaked), burn treatment, cold packs, eye covering, eye/skin wash, first aid guide, hand sanitizer, medical exam gloves, roller bandages, scissors, splint (class b kit specific) , sterile pads, tourniquet (class b kit specific), trauma pads, and triangular bandages. In addition, marking and labeling must be clear and permanent and the location of the kit must be easily accessible.

    By establishing two classes of first aid kits, the choice will be easier for the consumer. Each kit has a variety and plenty of supply of required items for the company workplace. The four types of kits will help the company choose what is required for them depending on the environment allowing for easy usage.

    Whether an office environment or a factory, it is required to be prepared to treat minor injuries. Even if you have a kit, it likely no longer includes content needed for the types of incidents that occur in the workplace. The International Safety Equipment Association 2015 minimum requirements for workplace first aid kits and supplies (American National Standard ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015) is effective now. The assortment and quantity of supplies included in a first aid kit were chosen based upon a review of increased workplace incidents requiring first aid treatment, similar international standards and current practices in treating injuries.


    Below we have listed the basic component & kit case requirements. We have also linked to products that will help you comply with these regulations. For full compliance information and for help complying with the new regulations please feel free to contact us at any time.

    Image displaying 2015 ANSI Class A Minimum Fill Requirements for Adhesive Bandages, Adhesive Tape, Antibiotic Treatment, Antiseptic, Breathing Barrier, Burn Dressing and more.
    Image displaying 2015 ANSI Class A Minimum Fill Requirements for Tourniquets, Sterile Pads, Roller Bandage, Medical Exam Gloves, Hand Sanitizer, Triangular Bandage and more.
  • CPR & AED Awareness Trivia / Quiz

    For CPR & AED Awareness Week, we have four questions for you.

    1)  Do you know CPR?

    2) Do you know how to use an AED?

    3) Do you know who knows CPR around you? (at home, work, school, or any membership or faith group)

    4) Do you know where the nearest AED is?

    If you answered "No" to any of these, you need to set a a group CPR & AED Training class at your location for ½ the Time, ½ the Price, and TWICE the Fun!™... and you should look into getting a corporate sponsored buy-down AED grant!

    (we actually promote CPR & AED Awareness Month - 1 week isn't enough!)

    CPR-AED-Image

  • Remember that every Home & Business should have an AED

    Now during CPR & AED Awareness Week (the first week of CPR & AED Awareness Month) we would like to remind you that AED devices can actually lead to recovery, while CPR alone most often can only maintain stasis until more advanced Lifesaving care arrives. You can purchase AEDs for very reasonable prices. If you have a little time to plan ahead, the AED Grant Program is an easy way to obtain corporate, buy down Grant funding to help reduce the cost further. This program is a partnership between AED Manufacturers and Corporate Sponsors to reduce the cost below any available online pricing to effect deployment of these critical devices as many places as possible. The program is available for Businesses, and even Individuals, not just Organizations and Non Profit Groups.

    AEDGrant.com

    If you are interested in an AED for your facility please go to www.AedGrant.com for more information about the AED Grant Program!

  • June is CPR & AED Awareness Month!

    That's right - a Month of activities and actions to bring more awareness to lifesaving CPR and amazing Automated External Defibrillators - both vital links in the Lifesaving Chain of Survival.

    What can YOU do for CPR & AED Awareness Month?

    Graphic of a street sign that states to PLan Ahead

    Plan ahead… start now! Keep yourself and others AWARE!

    You don’t know when or where you will be if a situation were to arise… Prepare yourself!

    Train your Group!

    Train your Group in CPR, AED & First Aid - These classes are fun, affordable, and take very little time. - especially when combined (add OSHA Standard First Aid & Bloodborne Pathogens & Universal Precautions).

    Get a Quote for CPR, AED or other training at your location, for your group for ½ the Time, ½ the Price, and TWICE the FUN!™ the more you combine, the more you save in time and money! Click for your Training Quote

    Apply for an AED Grant

    Graphic of a AED icon. A heart with a lighting bolt through the centerGet funding assistance for placing these vital lifesaving devices at Home, Work, or in the Community.

    See the www.AedGrant.com Program (Save $200 -$1000 off each AED with the program's assistance!)

    Refresh your skills!

    If you already have current CPR & AED Training and don’t need training just yet – and you don’t have access to an AED yet – Why not get a copy of our CPR DVD to play for your group (includes all updated CPR guidelines) or CPR masks or kits for your Team? These are fun, affordable (masks from 84¢ each!), appropriate, and will certainly help raise “Awareness” of CPR & AEDs! See our Cool CPR & AED Products

    Plan, Practice, Prepare!

    Give the gift of Life! Prepare your location and your people with the tools they need to comfortably, effectively, and safely perform CPR & AED Rescues. We offer affordable CPR Kits, CPR Keychains, CPR Masks & More...

    Watch and Share this FREE Video!

    Share this FREE VIDEO with everyone you know – Spread the Awareness!

    Follow us on Facebook & Twitter!

  • CPR & AED AWARENESS $ALE

    CPR_AED_SALE

    Believe it or not, our best CPR Manikin deal ever is back… it has been years, but in recognition of CPR & AED Awareness Week, we’re offering 20% off CPR Prompt®, Basic Buddy™, and Prestan® Products… even the awesome Prestan bilingual AED Trainer and the new Prestan Ultralite® Manikins!

    The manufacturers control pricing on these products (it’s called “Minimum Advertised Price policy”) so we are very fortunate to have permission to offer all of these best-selling CPR & AED training products at an even more exceptional value to help you raise awareness of critical lifesaving skills. Take advantage of this very rare deal to build your manikin militia and go wage war on sudden death!

    While we at American CPR Training™ have always promoted CPR & AED Awareness month, you’ll want to hurry to take advantage of these National CPR & AED Awareness Week Deals now. Enter code "Aware" in your shopping cart (not at checkout) for this EXTRA 20% OFF while stock is available.


    Offer expires at Midnight 06/30/16 Available Online at AmericanCPR.com or Toll Free - Offer cannot be combined with any other offers or incentives. Offer cannot be applied to completed orders. While supplies last, offer subject to substitution or change without notice. Call with questions or for further details.

  • Happy Memorial Day

    Happy-Memorial-Day

91-100 of 289