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Safety Books, CDs, Videos

When you are an employer it sometimes becomes tough to keep up with the strict safety regulations set forth by OSHA and other federal laws. Our Safety Books, CDs, and Videos articles will help you stay informed and educated. We cover topics such from DOT/49 CFR standards, federal OSHA/29 standards, forklift safety, maritime safety regulations, as well as fall protection regulations and much more. We have access to Americas leading resources on OSHA safety training news and training products. In turn you can recieve current specific information related to HAZMAT, HAZWOPER, accident investigation, personal protective equipment and much more. Federal safety compliance is a must know, so stay informed!
  • High Voltage

    We talked about the effects of electrical current on the human body as it relates to burns and cardiac arrest. But what about Electrical Safety in general?

    electrical-safety-tileBecause electricity is all around us, having some type of working knowledge of hazards, and emergencies attributed to electricity is important. Since electricity lights up our homes, powers much of the machinery and equipment that we use, and runs many of our tools, most employees take it for granted. Yet electricity can also be dangerous. Employees need to know how electricity works, and what they should do to protect themselves from its hazards. Our training products on Electrical Safety remind employees about electrical hazards they may face in their jobs, and provides the information they need to work safely around electricity. This program will also assist in satisfying the OSHA training requirements under 29 CFR Part 1910.331 (Electrical Safety Standard) for non-qualified employees.

    Occupations that face a higher than normal risk for an electrical accident - blue collar supervisor, electrical and electronic engineers, electricians, industrial machine operators, material handling equipment operators mechanics and repairers. NOTE: The workers in these groups do not need to be trained if their work or the work of those under their supervision are not close enough to exposed electrical parts that operate at 50 Volts or more.

    Another fun tidbit we pulled up from our OSHA 10 Hour training Materials developed last century was this chart of minimum required safe distance from power lines:

    High-Voltage

  • Accident Investigation

    Yesterday we discussed accidents in general. Today, we'll focus specifically on the importance of accident investigation in the workplace.

    Thousands of accidents occur throughout this country everyday. The failure of people, equipment, supplies, or surroundings to behave or react as expected causes most of them. Accident investigations determine how and why these failures occur. By using the information gained through an investigation, a similar, or perhaps more disastrous, accident may be prevented. It is important to conduct accident investigations with PREVENTION in mind, not just to take down facts and turn them into your administration.

    See our Accident Investigation Safety Training Programs, Posters, and Materials! See our Accident Investigation Safety Training Programs, Posters, and Materials!

    An unfortunate by-product of running a business, especially with any type of heavy machinery is that there is bound to be an accident. It is at this point that learning why the accident occured so there is not a repeat is paramount. That is why it is vital to conduct a thorough Accident Investigation. We have OSHA Safety Training Products to do just this. Our training products on "Accident Investigation" show employees steps that are taken in an accident investigation, and highlight how important it is for employees to fully cooperate with any inquiry. They also point out that while an investigation's focus is to determine the cause of an accident, the overall goal is to prevent similar accidents from happening again. Topics covered include accident investigation, learning about the root cause, the importance of investigative interviews and much more. With booklets, posters and games, learning doesn't have to be a snooze!

    "Accidents will happen". We have all heard that statement before. Unfortunately, sometimes it is true. In spite of our best efforts, things occasionally do go wrong. While many accidents seem to happen for obvious reasons, there may be things that contribute to an accident which are not always apparent. That is why it is vital to conduct a thorough Accident Investigation.

    Our training products on "Accident Investigation" show employees steps that are taken in an accident investigation, and highlight how important it is for employees to fully cooperate with any inquiry. They also point out that while an investigation's focus is to determine the cause of an accident, the overall goal is to prevent similar accidents from happening again. The topics covered in the products include:

    - The goals of an accident investigation.
    - Securing an accident scene.
    - "Root-cause" analysis.
    - The importance of investigative interviews.
    - Assisting in an accident investigation.
    - Reporting the "near misses".
    - The role of policies, equipment and training on accident prevention.
    - and more.

    DID YOU KNOW? There is an abundance of OSHA training materials in book and CD form that can be used by employers and employees alike to make sure they are up to date on the safety standards and regulations that pertain to their industry and job. Also there are alot of other type of materials such as safety posters and games that can be used to make sure that employees and even employers know how and what safety regulations need to be followed. Safety posters can be generally informative of regulations that can pertain to their specific job and/or industry or can direct employees where to find safety items such as emergency showers and flushing stations. Keep up to date and informed! DID YOU KNOW? There is an abundance of OSHA training materials in book and CD form that can be used by employers and employees alike to make sure they are up to date on the safety standards and regulations that pertain to their industry and job. Also there are alot of other type of materials such as safety posters and games that can be used to make sure that employees and even employers know how and what safety regulations need to be followed. Safety posters can be generally informative of regulations that can pertain to their specific job and/or industry or can direct employees where to find safety items such as emergency showers and flushing stations. Keep up to date and informed!
  • Accidents

    Many people believe that "accidents happen". They believe that the occurrence of an accident is inevitable and cannot be avoided. Some say "it was just bad luck" or "they were in the wrong place at the wrong time". All of these excuses fail to identify the true causes of accidents. One researcher found that for every serious or disabling injury, there are:

    • 10 minor injuries
    • 30 property damage incidents
    • 600 near-miss accidents

    What is an Accident?

    An "accident" is an unplanned, undesired event which may or may not result in injury or property damage, that interferes with the completion of an assigned task.

    A "near miss" is a form of an accident that does not result in injury or property damage.

    While much effort and time is expended on accident  investigation, this information tells us that we should be focusing on accident prevention. The majority of accidents are near-miss and may never be reported. The causes of accidents can be broken down into two basic components, unsafe conditions and unsafe acts.

    Unsafe conditions are hazardous conditions or circumstances that could lead directly to an accident.

    An unsafe act occurs when a worker ignores or is not aware of a standard operating procedure or safe work practice designed to protect the worker and prevent accidents.

    A worker needs a electrical switch rewired. A work request is submitted and the work scheduled for the following week. The employee decides, I need this sooner and tries to rewire the switch. The employee receives an electrical shock after failing to lock out the energy source.

    This above example illustrates how an employee may cut corners and commit an unsafe act.

    TABLE 1

    SUMMARY OF UNSAFE ACTS AND CONDITIONS

    Unsafe Acts Unsafe Conditions
    Operating equipment or machinery without permission Lack of guarding on machinery
    Defeating safety devices Defective tools or equipment
    Using defective equipment Crowding workers into one area
    Using the wrong tool for the job Inadequate alarm systems
    Not using personal protective equipment Fires & explosions
    Incorrect lifting techniques Poor housekeeping
    Working while intoxicated Hazardous atmospheres
    Horseplay Excessive noise
      Inadequate lighting

    All the examples of unsafe acts and conditions given in Table 1 are the result of personal or job factors. Personal and job factors are the root causes of accidents.

    Table 2 shows the personal and job factors which can lead to a unsafe act or condition.

    TABLE 2

    PERSONAL AND JOB FACTORS

    Personal Factors Job Factors
    Lack of knowledge or skills due to inadequate training Non-existent or poorly developed work standards
    Improper motivation Substandard equipment design
    Physical limitations of the worker Poor equipment maintenance
    Distractions which interfere with the worker’s ability to concentrate on their job Purchase of substandard equipment, tools, and materials
      Unusual increases in equipment usage

    The personal factors described in Table 2 generally lead to unsafe acts and the job factors are likely to contribute to the unsafe conditions. If you can identify the personal and job factors which may contribute to an accident in your work area, you have taken the first step toward the prevention of accidents.

    Accident Prevention

    Accident prevention involves the identification and elimination of causes before an accident occurs. Accident reaction is what most supervisors practice, that is, investigating the accident to determine the causes and then implementing corrective actions to avoid reoccurrence. This helps eliminate future accidents from a specific cause, but does nothing to address avoiding the accident that just occurred.

    One method of accident prevention that can be used by the supervisor is the Job Safety Analysis (JSA). A JSA takes a specific job (for example, removing a wheel from a vehicle) and identifies the following:

    1. Sequence of basic job steps.
    2. Potential hazards at each step.
    3. Recommended action or procedure to correct the potential hazards.

    JSA’s are most thorough when conducted by the supervisor and a worker skilled at the job. This also provides the worker with a sense of involvement and control over how their assignments are completed. Prioritize the selection of jobs for JSA. Jobs which have the most accidents, including injuries, property damage, and near misses, should receive the highest priority. Jobs with the potential for severe injury or property damage should be targeted next. Finally, be sure to conduct JSA’s on newly created jobs.

    Planned Job Observations (PJO) provide the supervisor with an opportunity to validate the JSA. A PJO is a procedure used by supervisors to determine if a worker is completing a job with maximum efficiency and quality. While many supervisors informally observe work on a daily basis, interruptions, distractions, and a lack of planning prevent the supervisor from gathering the information necessary to properly evaluate the worker’s performance. The PJO is performed by following these steps:

    1. Worker and Job Selection Workers should be selected for PJO based on the following priority:

    - New Workers

    - Poor Performers

    - Risk Takers

    - Good Performers

    Selecting jobs for PJO should focus on jobs with an accident history, jobs with the potential for serious injury or significant property damage, and jobs with a high probability of occurrence.

    2) Preparation

    The supervisor must make a commitment to be prepared for the PJO. The supervisor should review the JSA and other work procedures for that specific job.

    3) Job Observation

    When observing the worker, the guidelines listed below should be followed:

    - Stay out of the way!

    - Do not distract the worker.

    - Do not interrupt the worker.

    - Do not allow others to interrupt your observation of the worker.

    - Have a copy of the JSA with you to follow the job process step by step.

    4) Employee Review
    Review your observations with the employee as soon as practical after the PJO.

    5) Follow-Up

    Follow-up includes making changes to procedures or JSA’s as appropriate to your observation, retraining on job performance, or additional training not previously provided. Ensure that you follow-up with the worker or the value of the PJO will be lost.

    Accident Control

    In the event that an accident does occur, Supervisors will be instrumental in the control of the accident. Accident control can be broken down into three phases:

    1. Accident response
    2. Accident investigation
    3. Corrective actions

    Accident Response

    As a supervisor who witnesses an accident, your first priority is to safeguard workers, visitors, and yourself. Evacuate personnel to a safe area and tend to injured personnel immediately. Initiate the appropriate level of response for the accident. Secure the accident scene as soon as safely possible. This ensures that unauthorized personnel will not wonder into the accident scene and possibly be injured or exposed.

    Control of property damage can be addressed after attending to personnel issues and initiating the emergency response system.

    Whenever possible, supervisors should attempt to preserve evidence associated with the accident. This can be critical to determining the cause of an accident. It is best to prevent unauthorized personnel from entering the accident scene and disturbing the evidence. The evidence can be collected once the investigation team has been assembled and the investigation begun.

    See our Accident Investigation Safety Training Materials See our Accident Investigation Safety Training Materials

    Accident Investigation

    The investigation of an accident involves more than just completing a form. While forms are necessary for the documentation of the accident, supervisors should consider taking photographs or videotape of the accident scene. This level of documentation will be helpful at a later date when discussing the accident and can be used for training purposes.

    Supervisors should begin interviewing witnesses as soon as practical after the accident. It is best to interview witnesses alone and while the accident is still fresh in their mind. Here are some suggestions concerning interviewing.

    • Create a relaxed atmosphere with the interviewee. Try to put them at ease.
    • Interview at the accident scene when possible. This will allow the interviewee to point to various areas or equipment at the accident scene to illustrate what they are trying to communicate.
    • Interview each witness separately. This prevents witnesses from being swayed or intimidated by other workers. Each witnesses account of the accident can then be compared objectively to try to develop an accurate description of the accident.
    • Getting the witnesses objective account is critical. Avoid biasing the witness by leading them to a conclusion with your questions or by making judgmental remarks.
    • Restate the witness' account of the accident back to them when they are finished. This will identify any communication breakdowns during the interview and ensure that the interviewer is gathering an accurate account of the witness' statement.
    • End the interview in a positive manner and let the witness know how important their participation in the accident investigation is to the prevention of future accidents.
    • Let the witness know that it is appropriate to contact you at a later date if they remember any additional information relevant to the accident.

    accidentOne tool commonly used in accident investigations is to reenact the accident. This can provide insight as to the conditions faced by personnel during the accidents and what options were available for response. The reenactment must be done under strict controls to ensure that no one is injured during the reenactment.

    Documentation of the accident, including it’s causes and corrective actions is critical. At the Company, supervisors are required to complete a Liability Report Form within two work days following any work-related accident involving an employee or customer. Liability Report Form reports must be completed promptly and with sufficient detail to ensure a complete understanding of what caused the accident and how re-occurrence of the accident can be prevented.

    Corrective Actions

    Corrective actions are actions taken to prevent the re-occurrence of an accident. Corrective actions can be identified after the root cause(s) of the accident have been identified. Corrective actions should be included on the accident investigation report.

    Corrective actions need to:

    • Address the causes of the accident.
    • Prevent those causes from reoccurring.
    • Be achievable with the available resources.
    • Be readily implemented without disrupting production.
    • Be understood by the management and staff.

    Once corrective actions have been implemented, the work area supervisor must monitor and evaluate their effectiveness with

    regard to eliminating the causes of the accident. Failure to evaluate the corrective actions could result in the re-occurrence of the accident.

  • Winter Wonderland can be Winter Dangerland

    ecard-winteriscoming-snowmanAre you ready to battle Jack Frost?

    It’s Time to Prepare for Winter Weather

    Know what to do...

    Over the years employers have discovered that their employees miss more time from work as a result of "off-the-job" accidents than due to injuries experienced on the job. Many of these accidents occur during the winter holidays, as employees do things that they are not familiar with or haven't done "since last year". Fortunately, most of these accidents can be prevented.

    Our training products on "Winter Safety" show employees how to plan ahead, look for potential hazards and avoid dangerous situations that occur during the winter holiday season. Topics covered in these products include:

    See all our Winter Safety Products See all our Winter Safety Products

    - Christmas trees (selecting, transporting and setting up).
    - Using "string lights".
    - Safe use of extension cords and outlets.
    - Fires, fireplaces and chimneys.
    - Using candles.
    - Fire extinguishers and fire escapes.
    - Dressing for cold weather.
    - Working in the cold.
    - Walking and driving in ice and snow.

     

  • Behind the Wheel at Work

    NIOSH Launches Motor Vehicle Safety eNewsletter, Behind the Wheel at Work

    OSHA & DOT require Vehicle First Aid Kits in all business and fleet vehicles OSHA & DOT require Vehicle First Aid Kits in all business and fleet vehicles

    Preventing work-related motor vehicle crashes is the drive behind the NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety's research and communication efforts. To receive research updates, links to motor vehicle safety resources, practical tips on workplace driving, and news about upcoming events, subscribe to Behind the Wheel at Work, the NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety quarterly eNewsletter. Sign up here to receive the first issue soon.

    A step beyond mere DOT & OSHA compliance, this newsletter will help drivers and safety managers consider additional plans and resources available to keep those that drive as part of their work duties safe and healthy.

    Stay up to date on DOT regulations Stay up to date on DOT regulations

    Transporting Hazardous materials, anything of a hazardous nature or just being in the transportation business in general, it is very important to understand and follow all the guidelines set down by the Departments of Transportation (DOT) regarding any form of transportation and any type of transportation related security. CFR Title 49 is just this standard regulation that supports this. Whether its running a general trucking business or transporting hazardous materials by any mode of transportation, there are specific federal guidelines that regulate these actions and must be followed. Our DOT DVDs/VHS for Federal Motor Carriers, 49 CFR Hazardous Material Regulations, DOT Compliance & Compliance Kits, will ensure that you are and will be kept well informed of these important and ever changing regulations.

  • Online Training

    Proper CPR & First Aid training requires “hands-on” training. CPR is a lifesaving skill that everyone should have in case an emergency situation arises which would require CPR & First Aid skills. Training can be taken at a Training Center, Individually, or through your Employer or School group. There are many ways to learn CPR CPR & First Aid; which are generally a combination of corporate style, lecture, PowerPoint, video, and online. However in order to be considered valid; “hands-on” training must be part of the course.

    AppsNo matter what anyone may lead you to believe... You cannot get a recognized, national CPR & First Aid Certification online. Think about it (and read the fine print) ~ how would you learn to properly open a casualty's airway, breathe into their mouth, and give chest compressions at the proper depth and speed by clicking a mouse? Most providers that claim to offer online CPR certification issue you a certification card (if any) that states that you have completed an "Online CPR Course". And employer wants you to have CPR & First Aid certification - this is a different thing altogether. Legitimate online CPR courses require that you then attend a live instruction afterwards to demonstrate your proficiency in the skills themselves (and this comes at an additional cost). While we do have interactive training CDs and Home Learning Systems for sale online, we are not satisfied with the efficiency of any online training yet available.

    We recommend that you locate a fast, fun, and cost effective live course to begin with - it will actually save you time overall, and will get you a legitimate certification. Otherwise, if you are just looking to learn the skills, but do not need approved certification, we recommend one of our Home Learning Systems. We do not offer online CPR & First Aid Certification nor would we recommend it. But we do recommend American CPR Training™ - America's Favorite CPR, AED & First Aid Training™ - Leader in Safety Training throughout the US, Canada, & Mexico... We are ½ the Time, ½ the Price and TWICE the FUN!™

    Is it more expensive to do the training online?

    Yes. Not only does the online certificate bill you for the un-approved training- it also wastes your time and money! You will not be issued a refund but will have to retake the course! Other organizations will also bill you for books and kits. Not us! Our trainings are all-inclusive!

    Can you train me at my home?

    Yes, we train anywhere and everywhere! We come to you! We train Sunday thru Saturday (7 days a week), early mornings, evenings, and business hours.

    How long is your CPR course?

    2 ½ hours - Includes Adult, Child, and Infant C.A.R.E. CPR™; including AED principles, and Compression Only CPR, too! A 2 year certification card is included as well as Student Handbook, CPR Reminder Pen, & Student Practice Materials!

    How long is your First Aid course?

    2 ½ hours - This is an OSHA Standard First Aid & Emergency Care course which covers Soft tissue injuries, bleeding control, shock burns, musculoskeletal injuries, head, neck and spinal injuries, medical emergencies poisoning, heat and cold emergencies and more!

    How long is a combined course for CPR & First Aid?

    4 hours - Combining the topics will save you time and money! We issue a discounted rate for your groups. CPR & FA go hand in hand and together better prepare you for an emergency

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