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Bandages and First Aid

Do you know where to find tips and hints, from Americas leading professionals, about first aid kit information & stocking up on first aid products? Look no further. Stocking your first aid cabinet or emergency pack shouldn't be that tough. Our "Bandages and Frist Aid" articles will guide you in keeping up with top of the line bandages, burn products, antiseptics/ointments, medicinals, and antiseptic/disinfectant wipes. Are you OSHA compliant? Read up on our articles and find out how to keep you First Aid setup OSHA compliant and extra safe. We mean business but we also have fun First Aid product articles as well. Here we will read tip articles as well as success stories about sports first aid, camping & outdoor first aid, first aid for hiking, climbing, lifeguards & swimmers, as well as articles about pet first aid.
  • NEW ANSI 2015 WORKPLACE FIRST AID GUIDELINES

    WHY YOUR FIRST AID KIT NEEDS AN UPGRADE OR REPLACEMENT:

    American National Standard

    Minimum requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies Z308.1-2015

    Image displaying a 25 Person ANSI Class A First Aid Kit with Plastic CaseThe minimum requirements for workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies guidelines were approved to go into effect on June 17th, 2015 by the American National Standards Institute, Inc (ANSI). They decided to establish two classes of specific first aid kits,  Class A and Class B. These kits have been classified into four types- depending on the work setting and ensuring that each kit contained both a variety and an adequate supply of the essential items needed to deal with the most common types of injuries and/or illnesses that could occur at a workplace.

    • Class A kits are considered more basic for most general settings.
    • Class B kits have a larger variety of items and extra supply for workplace settings that are considered higher-risk or industry specific.

    Both kits have room for additional customizing. 2009 standards have been preserved for both class types, including the requirement of having scissors in both kits. A splint and a tourniquet are both required to be included in a class B kit. A splint by definition is a device used to immobilize body parts. A tourniquet by definition is a tight, wide band placed around an arm or a leg to constrict blood in order to stop flow through an artery. Pairing your kit with first aid training with better prepare the workplace to assist in case of an emergency.

    Image displaying a 50 Person ANSI Class B Contractor First Aid Kit with Metal CaseAnother variation of the standard requirements to be included is that the first aid kit containers be practical in regard to the workplace. The kits have been classified into four types. Type I kits are considered to be geared towards the general office settings, manufacturing facility or basic indoor use where there are no real high risk areas. These kits must have the ability to be mounted. Type II kits are to be transportable for indoor settings with no real “rough-handling” or equivalent to Type I kit environments. Type III kits are to be transportable, for both indoor and outdoor uses, and with the ability to be mounted. Common environments include both general indoor use and protected outdoor use. Type IV first aid Kits are Type II heavy and are to have a water resistance seal for added protection. Industries recommended to have these types of kits included the utility, transportation, construction and the armed forces.

    General requirements include the following items: Adhesive bandages, adhesive tape, antibiotic application, antiseptic, a breathing barrier, burn dressing (gel soaked), burn treatment, cold packs, eye covering, eye/skin wash, first aid guide, hand sanitizer, medical exam gloves, roller bandages, scissors, splint (class b kit specific) , sterile pads, tourniquet (class b kit specific), trauma pads, and triangular bandages. In addition, marking and labeling must be clear and permanent and the location of the kit must be easily accessible.

    By establishing two classes of first aid kits, the choice will be easier for the consumer. Each kit has a variety and plenty of supply of required items for the company workplace. The four types of kits will help the company choose what is required for them depending on the environment allowing for easy usage.

    Whether an office environment or a factory, it is required to be prepared to treat minor injuries. Even if you have a kit, it likely no longer includes content needed for the types of incidents that occur in the workplace. The International Safety Equipment Association 2015 minimum requirements for workplace first aid kits and supplies (American National Standard ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015) is effective now. The assortment and quantity of supplies included in a first aid kit were chosen based upon a review of increased workplace incidents requiring first aid treatment, similar international standards and current practices in treating injuries.


    Below we have listed the basic component & kit case requirements. We have also linked to products that will help you comply with these regulations. For full compliance information and for help complying with the new regulations please feel free to contact us at any time.

    Image displaying 2015 ANSI Class A Minimum Fill Requirements for Adhesive Bandages, Adhesive Tape, Antibiotic Treatment, Antiseptic, Breathing Barrier, Burn Dressing and more.
    Image displaying 2015 ANSI Class A Minimum Fill Requirements for Tourniquets, Sterile Pads, Roller Bandage, Medical Exam Gloves, Hand Sanitizer, Triangular Bandage and more.
  • Is your Business First Aid Kit Compliant?

    It may be TODAY, but won't be soon - new guidelines are effective June 17th!

    Learn about ANSI Z308.1-2015 First Aid Guidelines and how they affect your OSHA Compliance.

    Remember, too - as the labels state:

    Kit meets the ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015 standard as sold. It contains first aid products which meet performance specifications detailed in the standard at the below required minimum fill. It will continue to be compliant only when maintained with products that meet the standard at specified quantities.

    ANSI ISEA Z308 1-2015 Class A First Aid Kit Label

  • New ANSI First Aid Standard

    ANSI set new standards for Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies, which go into effect June 17th.

    Businesses are scrambling to get new ANSI 2015 First Aid Kits and ANSI 2015 Compliant First Aid Cabinets on order before the deadline to maintain  compliance and assure they don't get fines from OSHA or other regulatory agencies.

    ANSI has now designated two classes of First Aid Kits -

    Class A: Contents designed to deal with most common types of workplace injuries

    Class B: Broader range and quantity of supplies to deal with injuries in more complex or high-risk environments

    ANSI Says that in deciding which class of kit is more appropriate for a given workplace, employers should consider the risks and task load of the work environment and the potential severity and likelihood of occurrence of an injury. Employers should also consider whether multiple first aid kits are needed, based on the number of employees, physical layout of the work environment and the remoteness of the work-site to emergency services.

    The New First aid kit and supply requirements Z308.1-2015 call for much more content in the business first aid kits - the previous optional, or supplemental first aid items are now part of the required minimum fill, and many new items have been required.

    There are 12 new types of first aid items and significantly higher counts of previously ANSI standard first aid supplies required in these new ANSI workplace first aid kits that were never before required. This adds up to 22 additional pieces in the basic ANSI Class A workplace first aid kit, and a whopping 145 extra pieces in the Class B Kits and Cabinets.

    An American National Standard implies a consensus of those substantially concerned with its scope and provisions. An American National Standard is intended as a guide to aid the manufacturer, the consumer, and general public. The existence of an American National Standard does not in any respect preclude anyone, whether he has approved the standard or not, from manufacturing, marketing, purchasing, or using products, processes, or procedures not conforming to the standard. American National Standards are subject to periodic review and users are cautioned to obtain the latest edition.

    See all New ANSI 2015 Standard Compliant First Aid Kits and Cabinets! See all New ANSI 2015 Standard Compliant First Aid Kits and Cabinets!
  • What Kills Faster than Cardiac Arrest?

    Gretchen_LegBandageWe are, first and foremost, a CPR Training company - that is how we started, and where our hearts lie (no pun intended) - nevertheless, there is something that can kills faster than Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

    Severe bleeding can kill in 3-5 minutes... that is the impetus behind the efforts of the Hartford Consensus and the Stop The Bleed campaign we work to launch at the White House last Fall.

    Bleeding is a serious thing - learn how to make a difference... it is bystanders that save lives in the critical minutes before EMS arrives.

  • The Importance of First Aid Supplies in OSHA Compliance

    If neither you nor anyone you know has ever been seriously injured in the workplace, chances are you’ve got OSHA to thank. Created in 1970 by Congress, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration oversees every workplace in America to ensure safety and health for every working man and woman. OSHA regulates everything from limits on toxic substance exposure and use of protective equipment to employee training and access to information.

    OSHA standards differ from industry to industry, but one nearly universal regulation is that employees must have ready access to an appropriately stocked first aid kit or first aid cabinet. Some workplaces might require as little as bandages, gauze, and disinfectant wipes. More hazardous workplaces, however, might warrant a first aid kit with splints, resuscitation equipment, chemical eye wash, and more. Companies with 11 or more employees must also keep, maintain, and post easily accessible records of all workplace injuries for use by workers and OSHA staff during inspection.

    The benefits of OSHA compliance for workers should be obvious – safety, security, health, and peace of mind. But if you’re an employer, failing to comply with even simple OSHA standards can result in disruptive follow-up inspections, administrative citations, and even costly fines.
    Not sure if you have a first aid kit that’s up to snuff? Here’s a sample supply list from OSHA:

    Seem like a lot? Well, these are just the basics. Depending on the nature of the industry, OSHA inspectors might also require specialty personal protective equipment or clean-up kits for chemical and acid spills, body fluid clean-up, animal bites, and more.

    Even if you’re not an employer, you should take the safety of your home and family every bit as seriously as OSHA does in the workplace – accidents can happen off the clock too.

    American CPR Training™ proudly offers these CPR, AED, First Aid, BBP, Survival, Safety & Medical / Health Education Products!  Why these items? How do we choose? We have had a LOT of input - from you... our Clients, Students, and Instructors.  With 1000's of American CPR Training™ Instructors, Clients reaching from all the Fortune 500, through every branch of the Military and most Federal and State Governments down through Mom & Pop Shops and Scouting groups we've learned a lot. At almost a quarter of a century training people in lifesaving all over the US, Canada, Mexico and in fact every continent except Antarctica (we're working on that) American CPR Training™ has now certified 1 out of every 2,000 people in America.  This gives us a good perspective on what is needed for safety preparedness and compliance. Now throw in our core values (quality & value) and Bam! There's where our mix of products came from!  Don't see what you are looking for? Try the Search bar... still no luck? Call us! We'd love to help. CPR EQUIPMENT | FIRST AID KITS & REFILLS | AED PRODUCTS | SAFETY TRAINING MATERIALS | WHERE TO BUY CPR & FIRST AID SUPPLIES? ...AMERICAN CPR TRAINING™! American CPR Training™ proudly offers these CPR, AED, First Aid, BBP, Survival, Safety & Medical / Health Education Products!
    Why these items? How do we choose? We have had a LOT of input - from you... our Clients, Students, and Instructors.
    With 1000's of American CPR Training™ Instructors, Clients reaching from all the Fortune 500, through every branch of the Military and most Federal and State Governments down through Mom & Pop Shops and Scouting groups we've learned a lot. At almost a quarter of a century training people in lifesaving all over the US, Canada, Mexico and in fact every continent except Antarctica (we're working on that) American CPR Training™ has now certified 1 out of every 2,000 people in America.
    This gives us a good perspective on what is needed for safety preparedness and compliance. Now throw in our core values (quality & value) and Bam! There's where our mix of products came from!
    Don't see what you are looking for? Try the Search bar... still no luck? Call us! We'd love to help.
    CPR EQUIPMENT | FIRST AID KITS & REFILLS | AED PRODUCTS | SAFETY TRAINING MATERIALS |
    WHERE TO BUY CPR & FIRST AID SUPPLIES? ...AMERICAN CPR TRAINING™!
  • Safe Disposal

    SAFE DISPOSAL METHODS

    Equipment, cleaning materials, and personal protective equipment (PPE) that may have been contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) shall not be disposed of without proper safeguard procedures.

    SharpsObjects that may be contaminated must be carefully collected in specially marked biohazard bags, and removed from the premises by licensed Hazardous Waste contractors.

    • Biohazard bags are thick plastic bags, usually red in color, and are clearly marked with the biohazard label.

    • If temporarily stored on the premises, these biohazard bags must be securely fastened, double-bagged, and placed in a clearly labeled cardboard container.

    • Do not compress the contents.

    • Contaminated sharps (needles, broken glass, etc.) must be disposed of in specially designed sharps disposal containers.

    Sharps Disposal Containers are sealable containers, leakproof on 3 sides, puncture resistant, and clearly marked with the biohazard label.
    Biohazard bags and sharps disposal containers should be located in each first aid room at your facility.

  • How Do You Rate?

    Have you heard of the American Red Cross Ready Rating Program?

    We've been members here at American CPR Training™ since before it began.
    ...How is that?

    We were part of a group introduced to the concept and contributing input on what should be included in the program before the website and program were publicly released. While you might think we wouldn't promote the American Red Cross, since hey also offer CPR & First Aid Training, that's not the case at all. They provide a totally different type of service - they offer community classes by an large, while we specialize in on-site training for groups and especially businesses. Our main focus is getting this lifesaving education out to many and we do this through our streamlined, on-site "corporate style" presentation at ½ the Time, ½ the Price, and TWICE the Fun!™, through our experienced Instructors... the Red Cross offers a much longer course (more expensive, of course, too) through primarily layperson instructors... it's just not the same thing. (The American Red Cross is also a sizable, and valued customer of our products, so that makes us rather warm-and-fuzzy toward them, too!)

    We feel very strongly about participation in the Ready Rating program and strongly encourage you to join. It is 100% free.

    What is the Ready Rating Program?

    Created in 2008 by the St. Louis Area Chapter, Ready Rating was originally designed as a marketing tool that would help to open doors and allow conversations to take place within businesses, organizations and schools about how to better prepare for emergencies. However, the program became much more than that in a short amount of time. In 2009 the St. Louis Area Chapter was joined by American Red Cross chapters in the following eight (8) cities for a two-year pilot: New York, NY; Chicago, IL; Raleigh, NC; Washington, DC; Los Angeles, CA; San Francisco, CA; Dallas, TX; and, New Orleans, LA.

    With the financial support of the Ready Rating National Founding Sponsor, Anheuser Busch, the nine (9) pilot chapters have demonstrated that the Ready Rating program is valued by it members, and helps businesses, organizations and schools improve their levels of preparedness. This is demonstrated by an average increase in members’ Ready Rating assessment score of 14% the first year, and a dramatic 50% in the second year!

    In 2010, management of the Ready Rating program was transitioned to American Red Cross national headquarters, and with the addition of Sam’s Club as a National Sponsor, several enhancements to the Ready Rating website and tools were added to the program. The enhancements include a streamlined process for new members to sign up and begin using the program, an update of the assessment to better align with the Department of Homeland Security Private Sector Preparedness Guidance (PS-Prep), and increased capacity to make the Ready Rating program available nationwide. Beginning in 2015 the ReadyGo and ReadyAdvance Assessments as well as the Emergency Action Plans EAPGo and EAPAdvance meet or exceed minimal OSHA standards for organizational preparedness.

    Why should you join is the Ready Rating Program?

    Whether your are an American CPR TrainingClient, Affiliate Instructor, Student, or just a reader of our articles, there are great free benefits for you by becoming a Ready Rating Member.

    As a member of the Ready Rating program you will receive the following benefits:

      • Access to the online Ready Rating Dashboard, which can help you to evaluate your business, organization or school's level of preparedness
      • Access to the American Red Cross Ready Rating member seal that can be used to publicly display your commitment to preparedness to your constituents
      • Optional public recognition of your commitment to preparedness by choosing to be listed beside other like-minded organizations on this website in the Current Member Listing
      • Customized feedback and recommendations for improvement based on your assessment scores
      • Option to create an Organization Manager account that links the member accounts of multiple site/branches/locations/facilities, allowing for all of the 'child' accounts' assessments to be viewed by one 'parent' account.  Learn more...

    Want to learn more about how it works?

    Ready to join?

    See all our American Red Cross Emergency, Disaster, Survival, First Aid, & CPR Products! See all our American Red Cross Emergency, Disaster, Survival, First Aid, & CPR Products!

     

     

  • Our Free Gift to YOU! (Share this with your Friends & Family!)

    Tomorrow is Christmas, a time of giving... we've got something to share with you and your friends and family!

    Watch our FREE 22 minute video to teach some basic first aid skills and how to use those funny items you'll find in a First Aid Kit.

    HOW TO USE A FIRST AID KIT: WHAT YOUR FIRST AID COURSE DIDN'T TEACH YOU

    Watch this FREE 22 minute First Aid Video from American CPR Training™ Watch this FREE 22 minute First Aid Video from American CPR Training™
  • Bandaging a Wound

    Clean, Treat, Protect.

    These are the essential steps in caring for or bandaging a wound.

    Clean:

    Often, at the first site of blood, our reaction is to cover it up. This is a good thing. This is, in fact, and instinctual action 0 when we are cut or abraded we instinctively cover it with our hand, applying pressure (this is partly because our nerves can only send one type of signal at a time, and applying pressure means a large portion of the nerve endings in the injured are will send "pressure" signals to the brain instead of "pain" signals.)

    In first aid treatment, however, you need to remember that the goal is to improve the situation and avoid further harm. For minor wounds, the bleeding is not in-of-itself a major concern. The first concern in treating minor cuts and scrapes is to cleanse the wound, removing any foreign debris or contaminants. This can be as simple as washing with warm soap and water or wiping with an antiseptic, to carefully picking out debris and light scrubbing in the case of severe abrasions (like "road rash" - you definitely don't want all that junk left in a wound.. even the asphalt itself contains preservative properties which can worsen scarring.)

    This, of course, pertains primarily to treating a minor cut, scrape, incision, or abrasion - serious wounds, and sever bleeding are major life threatening issues (a victim can actually die faster from sever bleeding than from cardiac arrest!) learn how to Stop the Bleed.

    Treat:

    We know you are still yearning to slap on that bandage, but hold on - there's another step first! While covering and protecting the injury is certainly important (don't worry, we're getting there next) it is also very important that you apply an antibiotic and pain relief cream or ointment to provide a proper healing environment and to help prevent infection.

    Protect:

    OK Band-Aid lovers... here's your favorite part. Time to cover the wound (these three wound care treatment steps are sometimes referred to as "Clean, Treat & Cover".)

    image of a finger with an adhesive plastic bandage Cover it up and let it heal!

    After you have cleaned out any foreign contaminants and applied a salve to assist in healing the wound, it is time to cover it up. We Americans, by and large, have some silly notion that you should allow a wound to "breathe" in order to heal. Don't you believe it.

    According to Johnson & Johnson, only slightly more than 29% of us actually apply bandages or dressings to our wounds. It is important to understand that a covered wound heals faster. Covering the affected area with a dressing or an adhesive bandage and keeping it covered until the wound is completely healed protects the injury from dirt and germs that can cause infection.

    So should you dress a wound or bandage it? Both. dressings, like gauze pads and sponges, are applied to a wound to cover it and absorb any bleeding, bandages, such as roller gauze or other wraps and tapes are used to hold the dressing in place.

    Remember, though, not to remove the first layer of dressings... if a wounds bleeds through the bandaging, or if you feel for some other reason you should "change the dressings", do so, but don't remove the first layer of dressings applied against the skin - if these fall away freely, fin, but often they are adhered to the wound, or incorporated into the healing/scabbing processes so if you pull them away, you are likely to reopen the wound, causing new bleeding and possibly increasing any damage or scarring.

    (Got Kids? Or maybe, like us, you've got "Peter Pan Syndrome" and will never grow up... check out our super cool and fun theme decorated bandages!)

    DID YOU KNOW? Although many think that bandages are used to stop bleeding or infection, they’re actually used to hold a dressing in place. Typical "bandages" as we think of them, (like Band-Aid™ or our plastic/fabric bandages) are really a small bit of dressing attached with a small piece of bandages to put over the top of a separate piece of sterile dressing. This is important to note, because if you simply put a bandage over a wound without dressing, the wound will continue to bleed and runs the risk of becoming infected. Never put a bandage directly over a wound.

    NOTE: Puncture Wounds can be deep and a First Aider is unlikely to be able to clean out contaminants well. Do your best, then seek more advanced medical care.

     

  • Stop the Bleed

    Severe Bleeding is one of the most life-threatening emergencies. Blood loss, or exsanguination, can lead to death in as little as 5 minutes... considering that average national EMS response time is 8-14 minutes, you can see why this is a major threat to loss of life.

    We recently participated in project at the White House to address this issue. Working toward developing a program for Public enablement and awareness, with the Centers for Disease Control, FEMA, the Department of Homeland Security, National Security Council, as well as other representatives from select private sector groups and nonprofit organizations we are working to build awareness, implement and accelerate this initiative... learn more, stop "Standing By" - you can save lives.

    Stop the Bleed

    stopthebleedNo matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene.  A person who is bleeding can die from blood loss within five minutes, therefore it is important to quickly stop the blood loss.

    "Stop the Bleed" is a nationwide campaign to empower individuals to act quickly and save lives.

    Remember to be aware of your surroundings and move yourself and the injured person to safety, if necessary.

    Call 911.

    Bystanders can take simple steps to keep the injured person alive until appropriate medical care is available.  Here are three actions you can take to help save a life:

    Compress

    Compress

    Find where the bleeding is coming from and apply firm, steady pressure to the bleeding site with bandages or clothing

    Tourniquet

    Tourniquet

    If the bleeding doesn't stop, place a tourniquet 2-3 inches closer to the torso from the bleeding. (The tourniquet may be applied and secured over clothing.)

    Pull the strap through the buckle, twist the rod tightly, clip and secure the rod with the clasp or the Velcro strap.

    Compress Again

    Compress again

    If the bleeding still doesn't stop, place a second tourniquet closer to the torso from the first tourniquet.

    Pull the strap through the buckle, twist the rod tightly, clip and secure the rod with the clasp or the Velcro strap.

    * One type of tourniquet is depicted in the illustrations.

     


    Watch " A Perfect Stranger "

    A Perfect Stranger’ tells the story of Kinneil and Angelia and the event that brought the two women together. When a motorcycle accident left a frightened Angelia on the street alone and bleeding, Kinneil didn’t just stand by, she cared enough to stop and provide a comforting hand and a reassuring voice. It is a powerful reminder that at a moment’s notice, any one of us might find ourselves in a situation where we are the help until help arrives. In the end, this film calls on all Americans to remake what it means to be a bystander.

     

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