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Hazardous Materials Labels

The most important way to identify hazardous materials is a correct label on the outside of its container. From bottles and drums to trucks and rail cars, labels and placards provide information about the contents of a container, as well as what to do and who to call in case of an emergency. Because this information is so critical for the safe handling and transporting of these potentially dangerous substances, several organizations have developed labeling and placarding systems to communicate to employees about a container's contents. Our training products on Hazardous Materials Labels are designed to help employees understand the characteristics of different labeling systems and the ways that each convey information. By recognizing the differences and similarities of these systems, employees will be better prepared to work safely around hazardous materials.

"Exposure to hazardous chemicals is one of the most serious threats facing American workers today," said U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) is now aligned with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. This particular update to the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) will provide a common and coherent approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets. Once implemented, the revised standard will improve the quality and consistency of hazard information in the workplace, making it safer for workers by providing easily understandable information on appropriate handling and safe use of hazardous chemicals.