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Newest CPR Guidelines

American CPR Training announces new changes to take place in accordance with the newest ECC guideline changes for CPR
NEW DVD Including all the below & more - OUT NOW!!

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE THE NEW C.A.R.E. CPR™ DVD


The first step is now the easiest, no longer the hardest... "Don't Stress... Compress!"™

Newest CPR Guideline Updates

Bystander / Adult, Child &Infant CPR

Adult, Child &Infant CPR step sequence for CPR trained "bystander" rescuers will change from "A-B-C" (Airway, Breathing, Chest compressions) to "C-A-B" (Chest compressions, Airway, Breathing) for adults and pediatric patients (children and infants, excluding newborns). American CPR has implemented C.A.R.E. CPR™ as shown below - easier to learn &remember! Defibrillation and use of AEDs remains a vital part of the lifesaving sequence.
Also applies to Advanced/Healthcare CPR.


Bystander / One rescuer Adult, Child &Infant CPR will no longer include the step to "Look, Listen and Feel"
Also applies to Advanced/Healthcare CPR.


A compression rate of 100+ per minute.
Also applies to Advanced/Healthcare CPR.


Adult chest compression depth: push down on the adult breastbone at least 2 inches (5 cm).
Also applies to Advanced/Healthcare CPR.


"Don't Stress... Compress!"™
All trained rescuers should provide chest compressions for victims of cardiac arrest. In addition, if the trained rescuer is able to perform rescue breaths, compressions and breaths should be provided in a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths, averaging 100+ compressions per minute.

But... If a trained rescuer cannot perform the rescue breaths, or a bystander is not trained in CPR, the bystander should provide compression-only CPR for the adult victim who suddenly collapses, with 100+ rapid and firm compressions in the center of the chest. Whenever available, follow the directions of the EMS/911 dispatcher. As always, a rescuer should relinquish care to any better prepared or trained rescuer, while remaining to assist and assure quality of care.


These changes will be reflected in our new Instructor &Student Materials as well as our New CPR DVD release. Learn the newest CPR Steps Guidelines with the excellent NEW GUIDELINES CPR DVD VIDEO.

American CPR Training graphic reading: Save a Life - Show you CARE!
Check for responsiveness no breath, gasping, or inadequate breathing
Call 911 / Activate EMS get an AED if available
Compress Chest, deliver 30 compressions, heels of both hands at center of chest, rate of 100+ per minute, depth of at least 2 inches
Airwaw, open airway, tilt head, lift chin (if no neck trauma suspected)
Rescue Breathing, pinch nose, seal mouth, deliver 2 breaths, about 1 second each breath, watch chest rise, continue 30:2 compression to breath cycle
External Defi brillation, use of an AED is a vital part of the lifesaving sequence, know where the nearest AED is located
If a trained rescuer cannot perform the rescue breaths included in full CPR, or a bystander is not trained in CPR, the rescuer should provide compression-only CPR for the adult victim who suddenly collapses, with 100+ rapid and fi rm compressions per minute in the center of the chest.
Graphic of students practicing chest compressions

American CPR Training: CPR Update
New 2010 ECC / ILCOR Guidelines

American CPR Training LogoThe first step is now the easiest…
“Don’t Stress…Compress!”™
CARE CPR™

2010 CPR Guideline Updates are based on the most current literature and evidence available.
(Bookmark this page for the new 2015 CPR guidelines coming at end of year!)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of actions that may significantly increase the chance of survival following cardiac arrest. In most cardiac arrests, the critical elements of CPR are chest compressions and early defibrillation. Each situation is different depending on the rescuer, the victim, and the circumstances, but the key to success is early intervention.

In the updated C-A-R-E sequence, chest compressions will be initiated right away and rescue breathing only minimally delayed for all age groups, other than newborns.

The A-B-C steps could be a reason why less than one third of people in cardiac arrest receive bystander CPR. A-B-C starts with the most difficult steps: opening the airway and delivering rescue breaths. C-A-R-E starts with the easiest step: chest compressions.

Adult, Child & Infant CPR: Major changes
Adult, Child & Infant CPR steps for the trained “bystander” rescuers will change from “A-B-C” (Airway, Breathing, Compressions) to “C-A-R-E” (Compress Chest, Airway, Rescue Breathing & External Defibrillation). Newborn care will continue with A-B-C sequence.

External Defibrillation and use of an AED remains a critical part of the steps. Also applies to Advanced / Healthcare CPR.

Bystander / One rescuer Adult, Child & Infant CPR will no longer include the step to “Look, Listen and Feel”. Also applies to Advanced / Healthcare CPR.

Chest compressions are the foundation of effective CPR
• A compression rate of 100+ per minute.
• Also applies to Advanced / Healthcare CPR.

Adult compression depth: push down at least 2 in. (5+ cm)
Child compression depth: push down 2 in. (5 cm) or at least 1/3 the anterior-posterior dimension of the chest.
Infant compression depth: push down 1-1/2” in. (4 cm) or at least 1/3 the anterior-posterior dimension of the chest.
Also applies to Advanced / Healthcare CPR.

Effective CPR includes proper compression depth and rate depending on the victim’s size and that complete chest recoil is allowed to maximize the benefit of the chest compressions.

“Don’t Stress…Compress!”™ Compression-Only CPR
All trained rescuers should provide chest compressions for victims of cardiac arrest. In addition, if the trained rescuer is able to perform rescue breaths, compressions and breaths should be provided in a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths, averaging 100+ compressions per minute. But…If a trained rescuer cannot perform the rescue breaths, or a bystander is not trained in CPR, the bystander should provide compression-only CPR for the adult victim who suddenly collapses, with a rate of 100+ rapid and firm compressions in the center of the chest. Compression-Only CPR is an acceptable life-saving method for Bystander Rescuers not trained in full CPR, or Trained Rescuers unable to perform Rescue Breaths included in CPR. Whenever available, follow the directions of the EMS/911 dispatcher.

©American CPR Training – a division of Express Companies, Inc. & part of the Safety.com family of Safety Providers.

BOOKMARK THIS PAGEYou’ll find the new 2015 CPR guidelines here soon! (2015 CPR guidelines go into effect in 2016 – as usual, American CPR Training will be the first National Organization our with all new Student & Instructor materials reflecting the updated CPR guidelines!)